How do we inform regional change...

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Research

Drawing on inter-disciplinary expertise, the CRC produces cutting edge research on critical dimensions of regional change, including civic engagement, economic development, environmental justice, regional equity, and youth health & well-being.

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Collaboration

The CRC work is founded on the principle of collaboration, and the belief that regional change is catalyzed by diverse groups of individuals and organizations engaged in a process of mutual inquiry and action.

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Innovation

Field-shaping research methods and data tools, such as socio-spatial mapping, multi-indicator indices of well-being and vulnerability and participatory action research provide unique contributions to scholarship and practices of regional change.

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Application

The CRC’s research is solutions oriented and intended to inform public policy, community advocacy, economic development, and human/ social service sectors in their work to build healthy, prosperous, sustainable, and equitable communities and regions.

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Communication

Clear and visually compelling designs and creative use of multiple media ensure that the CRC’s research reaches and informs its intended audiences.

Latest CRC News

Latest CRC News

Announcing New Associate Director of the CRC

By Jonathan London
August 2016

Central to the CRC's mission is our role as a bridge, linking the university with diverse organizations in the policy, non-profit, business, and philanthropic sectors.  This community-engaged scholarship requires expertise in research, external partnerships, and university administration. As CRC director for the past eight years, I have provided leadership in all three areas.  To catalyze our next phase of growth and development, the CRC has created a new position of Associate Director to take on crucial administrative leadership roles, and to expand and deepen our external partnerships.  This will allow me, as Faculty Director, to focus primarily on the CRC's research and faculty engagement strategies.

I am now thrilled to announce that Bernadette Austin will join the CRC as its first Associate Director.  I have known Bernadette for over 10 years, first as a student in our Community Development graduate program, and then as an increasingly prominent leader in the public and private community development sectors in the Sacramento region.  Over the past decade, Bernadette has been a regional change maker through her leadership roles in the Sacramento Housing and Redevelopment Authority and DOMUS Development, non-profit boards such as the Urban Land Institute and Alchemist Community Development Corporation, and her appointed service on the Planning Commission, as well as serving as the Parks and Recreation Commissioner for the City of West Sacramento.  Bernadette's powerful combination of substantive expertise in many of the CRC's thematic areas, her values on social equity and inclusion, and her deep capacities in organizational leadership will make her an ideal Associate Director.  Welcome, Bernadette!

 

Greenlining Aims to Reclaim Parts of Stockton

August 2016

Sergio Cuellar, Community Engagement Coordinator for the UC Davis Center for Regional Change, was quoted by Recordnet.com during a forum in Stockton titled "Greenlining the Hood: Reclaim & Rebuild Our City".

To read the full article, CLICK HERE.

 

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A Toxic History: Sacramento Region's Minority Communities Face a Legacy of Environmental Injustice

July 2016

An October 2015 environmental justice report by the Center for Regional Change (CRC) at UC Davis illustrated that minorities were pushed to outer neighborhoods like Oak Park, Del Paso Heights and south Sacramento during the 20th century through discriminatory land-use policies like racial covenants in housing deeds, which explicitly blocked properties from being sold to African-Americans, and "redlining," which refers to the federal government's denial of mortgages based on race and ethnicity.  A concept that has become known as "environmental injustice" soon flourished.  The term refers to the idea that low-income neighborhoods and communities of color are saturated with environmental hazards and "systematically excluded from decision-making" that could prevent or mitigate their effects," Jonathan London, director of the CRC, wrote in a March 6 op-ed for the Davis Enterprise.

To read the full article, CLICK HERE.